Category Archives: Technical

Russia is Jamming American Drone Operating

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[Update: April 11, 2018] – According to U.S. officials Russia is seriously affecting American military operations by jamming some U.S. military drones operating in the skies over Syria.

The Russians began  jamming the GPS of  some smaller U.S. drones several weeks ago.

Russian army now has advanced drone hunting units. (interestingengineering.com)

Jamming, which means blocking or scrambling a drone’s reception of a signal from a GPS satellite, can be uncomplicated, according to Dr. Todd Humphreys, the director of the Radionavigation Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin.

“GPS receivers in most drones can be fairly easily jammed,” he said.

Humphreys, an expert on the spoofing and jamming of GPS, warns this could have a significant impact on U.S. drones, causing them to malfunction or even crash. “At the very least it could cause some serious confusion” for the drone operator on the ground if the drone reports an incorrect position or is lost, he said.

The officials said the equipment being used was developed by the Russian military and is very sophisticated, proving effective even against some encrypted signals and anti-jamming receivers. The drones impacted so far are smaller surveillance aircraft, as opposed to the larger Predators and Reapers that often operate in combat environments and can be armed.

Dr. Humphreys says that though the attacks occur in cyberspace, the results are still serious.

Russia shows several drones captured in Syria (dailymail.co.uk).

“They are a little less hostile looking than a kinetic bullet but sometimes the effect can be just as damaging,” he said. “It’s like shooting at them with radio waves instead of bullets.” (story content credited: fighterjetsworld.com). Continue reading

Don’t be Taken for a Ride!

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As a trusted manufacturer of RF and microwave components for over 30-years, we know that you will be extremely satisfied with the quality and support we provide to each and every customer. We have the pleasure of working with companies, labs and universities both large and small and from around the globe.

Offering world-class manufacturing capabilities, Coaxicom delivers standard and custom designed connectors (all-series), cable assembliesphase adjustersadaptersterminations, attenuatorsdust capspinstorque wrenches and more.

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Coaxicom understands what customers need and strive to find innovative ways to deliver by offering:

  • Large piece part inventory in-stock and ready for assembly
  • Short lead times
  • Custom cable assemblies
  • Quote and ship same day, if needed
  • Engineering services
  • New design and retro-fit experts
  • Advanced cross reference tool
  • Quality materials by a US manufacturer
  • Meets military specifications including MIL-PRF 39012
  • Specialists in hard-to-find or obsolete parts
  • Responsive customer service support

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Harris to provide sophisticated electronic warfare (EW) jamming systems for combat aircraft

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Harris to provide sophisticated electronic warfare (EW) jamming systems for combat aircraft.

PATUXENT RIVER NAS, Md. –Electronic warfare (EW) experts at Harris Corp. will provide the U.S. Navy and Australian air force with 86 sophisticated EW jamming systems designed to protect combat aircraft from incoming radar-guided missiles.

Officials of the Naval Air Systems Command at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Md., on Thursday announced a $161 million order to the Harris Corp. Electronic Systems segment (formerly Exelis Inc.) in Clifton, N.J., to build 86 full-rate production lot 15 AN/ALQ-214A(V)4/5 integrated defensive electronic countermeasures jammer systems for the F/A-18C/D and F/A-18E/F Hornet and Super Hornet jet fighter-bombers.

 The AN/ALQ-214A(V)4/5 is an electronic jammer component of the integrated defensive electronic counter measures system (IDECM) from a joint venture of Harris and BAE Systems. It protects F/A-18 fighter-bombers from radar-guided surface-to-air and air-to-air missiles by jamming the enemy missile guidance systems.

The ALQ-214 component of the IDECM EW system has been delivered to the U.S. Navy, as well as to the Royal Australian Air Force for contemporary versions of the Boeing F/A-18 fighter-bomber. The system blends sensitive receivers and active countermeasures to form an electronic shield around the aircraft, Harris officials say.

The RF countermeasure system engages incoming missiles autonomously with a series of measures designed to protect the aircraft from detection.

 

The AN/ALQ-214A(V)4 a smaller and lighter version of its predecessors, and has an open-architecture design that is ready for integration on several different kinds of aircraft.

The system is designed to counter radar-guided anti-aircraft missiles with electronic countermeasures (ECM) techniques that deny, disrupt, delay, and degrade the enemy missile launch and engagement sequence. The system identifies, ranks, and counters incoming missiles, and displays engagements to the flight crew for situational awareness. (contentcredit: http://www.militaryaerospace.com, February 12, 2018, By John Keller, Editor)

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Here’s When China’s Space Station Will Fall Back to Earth!

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Scientists have finally determined when China’s oldest space station will crash back to our planet.

The space lab, named “heavenly palace,” is still in orbit. Earlier in March, experts put the re-entry period between March 24 and April 19, but couldn’t give a more precise estimate.

The lack of accuracy was understandable: At low orbit, below about 2,000 km above the planet’s surface, objects will eventually lose speed and fall back to Earth if they don’t continue to exert a force to propel themselves.

However, the drag from Earth’s atmosphere that acts on objects at this height is not consistent, so pinpointing exactly when the space station, which is currently orbiting at about 250 km above the planet, will begin its descent is very difficult.

Don’t worry about checking the sky during the days the space station is likely to make its re-entry, though.

“The personal probability of being hit by a piece of debris from the Tiangong-1 is actually 10 million times smaller than the yearly chance of being hit by lightning,” the ESA said.

While there is little risk that the debris from the space station will endanger humans, the ESA is still trying to determine a ballpark idea of where on Earth the space station will make landfall.

“At no time will a precise time/location prediction from ESA be possible,” the ESA said.

It’s most likely to crash into the ocean somewhere between latitudes 43° north and 43° south, but that’s about as much as people will know before Tiangong-1 falls from orbit.

“We need to get used to the idea of things raining down on us from space,” University of Texas researcher Leon Vanstone wrote in a commentary piece for Fortune, noting that falling satellites are only going to become more common as the number of launches continues to increase.

Scientists are still searching for solutions to the problem of dealing with free-falling satellites and other space debris. Options so far include shooting them down with lasers, as China proposed earlier this year. (content credited by: March 21st, 2018, http://amp.timeinc.net, Fortune Briefing)


STUART, FLORIDA – Coaxial Components Corp. (Coaxicom), a company dedicated to the design and manufacturing of RF and Microwave components is honored to be a small part of many of today’s engineering and research achievements.

Whether it’s working with Yale University on non-magnetic connectors, supplying SMA/TNC connectors to NASA, specialized torque wrenches to Argonne National Labs, or hand-crafting, custom cable assemblies for a mid-west university for advancing cardio healthcare.

Companies and organizations from around the globe seek Coaxicom’s parts and expertise because we’ve earned the reputation for military-and medical grade quality, speed and innovation.

To learn more about Coaxicom or to Request a Quote email us here. Or get an instant download of the Product Reference Sheet.

RETURN TO WEBSITE HERE

Tiny Things Have Huge Impact for Electrical Engineering: 2018 Update

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SUNY Poly researcher rockets technology into extreme environments.

In Fatemeh (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik’s SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) laboratory, tiny things have huge impacts for electrical engineering.

As a professor in the nanoengineering constellation and interim dean of graduate studies, Shahedipour-Sandvik researches ways to improve electronic devices for use in extreme environments—think of on top of spacecraft or inside jet engines. By making specific molecular changes to semiconductors, a key piece of electronic circuitry, she and her team are creating components to run powerful electronics in the harshest of conditions.

As the name suggests, semiconductors fall somewhere between highly conductive metals like copper or gold and insulators, which prevent the flow of electricity. Unlike conductors, which provide constant electric flow, semiconductors can be turned “on” or “off.” This added regulator makes them crucial in controlling electronic devices from cell phones to LED lights to solar panels.

“Semiconductors are fascinating,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said. “Especially the novel materials we’re working with; it’s a really amazing material system because of the unique and extreme properties it offers.”

Shahedipour-Sandvik has spent her career exploring semiconductors, from her PhD research on semiconducting diamonds at the University of Missouri, to her lab’s current work on developing new technology for operation under harsh environments.

Since arriving at SUNY Poly in 2001, her research efforts have been well recognized by the university and the state. Her many awards include the 2006 Rising to Lead Best Technologist Award from the city of Albany’s Alliance of Technology and Women and a 2012 Excellence in Research award from the University at Albany.

Most recently, Shahedipour-Sandvik and colleagues were awarded $720,000 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to study next-generation semiconductors for application in high power electronics. Unlike the silicon semiconductors found in many personal electronic devices, she is developing components with a gallium nitride (GaN) base.

“In comparison to silicon, GaN can be used to create devices that work in harsh environments,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said, referring to electronic “noise” appearing in silicon semiconductors under extreme conditions. This noise comes from unwanted current flowing when the semiconductor should be in an “off” state, compromising device function.

“Not only does GaN have fascinating properties, the system holds great promises for technological advances,” she said.

Semiconductors consist of a lattice of atoms, like silicon or gallium and nitride for GaN, with different elements incorporated into the lattice through a process called doping. With two types of doping, “p-type” and “n-type”, current flow can be controlled by the choice of element used as a dopant. The relatively short length of the bonds in the GaN lattice is key to its ability to withstand harsh environments.

Working with collaborators from SUNY Poly, the Army Research Lab, Drexel University, and Gyrotron Technology, Inc. (Gyrotron), Shahedipour-Sandvik is hoping to overcome one of the major challenges in creating these next-generation devices: effective p-type doping in the GaN base.

Fortunately Gyrotron has a new method for activating the dopant, magnesium, introduced through a process called implantation. By using microsecond pulses of electromagnetic waves, the GaN base temperatures may be increased to over 1300 degrees Celsius. Along with a method to stabilize the lattice, the team hopes to get high levels of doping without damaging the GaN lattice.

Freezing point of water set at 0 and boiling point set at 100, so there is 100 degrees between them and each degree is 1/100 of the difference between these two points.

Additionally, Shahedipour-Sandvik will build the new semiconductors on a GaN base, which ensures the best electricity flow and highest performance as compared to bases of a different material than the lattice. Although GaN bases are expensive and hard to come by, Shahedipour-Sandvik has high hopes: “even if these devices are made on small areas in low volume, they’re still going to be very impactful.”

With this diverse team focused on developing next-generation semiconductors, this new technology may soon become a reality, Shahedipour-Sandvik said.

“It really takes a team that has complementary expertise to fully understand the fundamentals of the GaN system and overcome its inherent challenges.”

In Fatemeh (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik’s SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) laboratory, tiny things have huge impacts for electrical engineering.

As a professor in the nanoengineering constellation and interim dean of graduate studies, Shahedipour-Sandvik researches ways to improve electronic devices for use in extreme environments—think of on top of spacecraft or inside jet engines. By making specific molecular changes to semiconductors, a key piece of electronic circuitry, she and her team are creating components to run powerful electronics in the harshest of conditions.

As the name suggests, semiconductors fall somewhere between highly conductive metals like copper or gold and insulators, which prevent the flow of electricity. Unlike conductors, which provide constant electric flow, semiconductors can be turned “on” or “off.” This added regulator makes them crucial in controlling electronic devices from cell phones to LED lights to solar panels.

“Semiconductors are fascinating,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said. “Especially the novel materials we’re working with; it’s a really amazing material system because of the unique and extreme properties it offers.”

Shahedipour-Sandvik has spent her career exploring semiconductors, from her PhD research on semiconducting diamonds at the University of Missouri, to her lab’s current work on developing new technology for operation under harsh environments.

Since arriving at SUNY Poly in 2001, her research efforts have been well recognized by the university and the state. Her many awards include the 2006 Rising to Lead Best Technologist Award from the city of Albany’s Alliance of Technology and Women and a 2012 Excellence in Research award from the University at Albany. Shahedipour-Sandvik was also named the first Presidential Fellow at the Research Foundation for the 2013-14 academic year.

Most recently, Shahedipour-Sandvik and colleagues were awarded $720,000 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to study next-generation semiconductors for application in high power electronics. Unlike the silicon semiconductors found in many personal electronic devices, she is developing components with a gallium nitride (GaN) base.

“In comparison to silicon, GaN can be used to create devices that work in harsh environments,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said, referring to electronic “noise” appearing in silicon semiconductors under extreme conditions. This noise comes from unwanted current flowing when the semiconductor should be in an “off” state, compromising device function.

“Not only does GaN have fascinating properties, the system holds great promises for technological advances,” she said.

Semiconductors consist of a lattice of atoms, like silicon or gallium and nitride for GaN, with different elements incorporated into the lattice through a process called doping. With two types of doping, “p-type” and “n-type”, current flow can be controlled by the choice of element used as a dopant. The relatively short length of the bonds in the GaN lattice is key to its ability to withstand harsh environments.

Working with collaborators from SUNY Poly, the Army Research Lab, Drexel University, and Gyrotron Technology, Inc. (Gyrotron), Shahedipour-Sandvik is hoping to overcome one of the major challenges in creating these next-generation devices: effective p-type doping in the GaN base.

Fortunately Gyrotron has a new method for activating the dopant, magnesium, introduced through a process called implantation. By using microsecond pulses of electromagnetic waves, the GaN base temperatures may be increased to over 1300 degrees Celsius. Along with a method to stabilize the lattice, the team hopes to get high levels of doping without damaging the GaN lattice.

Additionally, Shahedipour-Sandvik will build the new semiconductors on a GaN base, which ensures the best electricity flow and highest performance as compared to bases of a different material than the lattice. Although GaN bases are expensive and hard to come by, Shahedipour-Sandvik has high hopes: “even if these devices are made on small areas in low volume, they’re still going to be very impactful.”

With this diverse team focused on developing next-generation semiconductors, this new technology may soon become a reality, Shahedipour-Sandvik said.

“It really takes a team that has complementary expertise to fully understand the fundamentals of the GaN system and overcome its inherent challenges.”

As a professor in the nanoengineering constellation and interim dean of graduate studies, Shahedipour-Sandvik researches ways to improve electronic devices for use in extreme environments—think of on top of spacecraft or inside jet engines. By making specific molecular changes to semiconductors, a key piece of electronic circuitry, she and her team are creating components to run powerful electronics in the harshest of conditions.

As the name suggests, semiconductors fall somewhere between highly conductive metals like copper or gold and insulators, which prevent the flow of electricity. Unlike conductors, which provide constant electric flow, semiconductors can be turned “on” or “off.” This added regulator makes them crucial in controlling electronic devices from cell phones to LED lights to solar panels.

“Semiconductors are fascinating,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said. “Especially the novel materials we’re working with; it’s a really amazing material system because of the unique and extreme properties it offers.”

Shahedipour-Sandvik has spent her career exploring semiconductors, from her PhD research on semiconducting diamonds at the University of Missouri, to her lab’s current work on developing new technology for operation under harsh environments.

Since arriving at SUNY Poly in 2001, her research efforts have been well recognized by the university and the state. Her many awards include the 2006 Rising to Lead Best Technologist Award from the city of Albany’s Alliance of Technology and Women and a 2012 Excellence in Research award from the University at Albany. Shahedipour-Sandvik was also named the first Presidential Fellow at the Research Foundation for the 2013-14 academic year.

Most recently, Shahedipour-Sandvik and colleagues were awarded $720,000 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to study next-generation semiconductors for application in high power electronics. Unlike the silicon semiconductors found in many personal electronic devices, she is developing components with a gallium nitride (GaN) base.

“In comparison to silicon, GaN can be used to create devices that work in harsh environments,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said, referring to electronic “noise” appearing in silicon semiconductors under extreme conditions. This noise comes from unwanted current flowing when the semiconductor should be in an “off” state, compromising device function.

“Not only does GaN have fascinating properties, the system holds great promises for technological advances,” she said.

Semiconductors consist of a lattice of atoms, like silicon or gallium and nitride for GaN, with different elements incorporated into the lattice through a process called doping. With two types of doping, “p-type” and “n-type”, current flow can be controlled by the choice of element used as a dopant. The relatively short length of the bonds in the GaN lattice is key to its ability to withstand harsh environments.

Working with collaborators from SUNY Poly, the Army Research Lab, Drexel University, and Gyrotron Technology, Inc. (Gyrotron), Shahedipour-Sandvik is hoping to overcome one of the major challenges in creating these next-generation devices: effective p-type doping in the GaN base.

Fortunately Gyrotron has a new method for activating the dopant, magnesium, introduced through a process called implantation. By using microsecond pulses of electromagnetic waves, the GaN base temperatures may be increased to over 1300 degrees Celsius. Along with a method to stabilize the lattice, the team hopes to get high levels of doping without damaging the GaN lattice.

Additionally, Shahedipour-Sandvik will build the new semiconductors on a GaN base, which ensures the best electricity flow and highest performance as compared to bases of a different material than the lattice. Although GaN bases are expensive and hard to come by, Shahedipour-Sandvik has high hopes: “even if these devices are made on small areas in low volume, they’re still going to be very impactful.”

With this diverse team focused on developing next-generation semiconductors, this new technology may soon become a reality, Shahedipour-Sandvik said.

“It really takes a team that has complementary expertise to fully understand the fundamentals of the GaN system and overcome its inherent challenges.”

As a professor in the nanoengineering constellation and interim dean of graduate studies, Shahedipour-Sandvik researches ways to improve electronic devices for use in extreme environments—think of on top of spacecraft or inside jet engines. By making specific molecular changes to semiconductors, a key piece of electronic circuitry, she and her team are creating components to run powerful electronics in the harshest of conditions.

As the name suggests, semiconductors fall somewhere between highly conductive metals like copper or gold and insulators, which prevent the flow of electricity. Unlike conductors, which provide constant electric flow, semiconductors can be turned “on” or “off.” This added regulator makes them crucial in controlling electronic devices from cell phones to LED lights to solar panels.

“Semiconductors are fascinating,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said. “Especially the novel materials we’re working with; it’s a really amazing material system because of the unique and extreme properties it offers.”

Shahedipour-Sandvik has spent her career exploring semiconductors, from her PhD research on semiconducting diamonds at the University of Missouri, to her lab’s current work on developing new technology for operation under harsh environments.

Since arriving at SUNY Poly in 2001, her research efforts have been well recognized by the university and the state. Her many awards include the 2006 Rising to Lead Best Technologist Award from the city of Albany’s Alliance of Technology and Women and a 2012 Excellence in Research award from the University at Albany. Shahedipour-Sandvik was also named the first Presidential Fellow at the Research Foundation for the 2013-14 academic year.

Most recently, Shahedipour-Sandvik and colleagues were awarded $720,000 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to study next-generation semiconductors for application in high power electronics. Unlike the silicon semiconductors found in many personal electronic devices, she is developing components with a gallium nitride (GaN) base.

“In comparison to silicon, GaN can be used to create devices that work in harsh environments,” Shahedipour-Sandvik said, referring to electronic “noise” appearing in silicon semiconductors under extreme conditions. This noise comes from unwanted current flowing when the semiconductor should be in an “off” state, compromising device function.

“Not only does GaN have fascinating properties, the system holds great promises for technological advances,” she said.

Semiconductors consist of a lattice of atoms, like silicon or gallium and nitride for GaN, with different elements incorporated into the lattice through a process called doping. With two types of doping, “p-type” and “n-type”, current flow can be controlled by the choice of element used as a dopant. The relatively short length of the bonds in the GaN lattice is key to its ability to withstand harsh environments.

Working with collaborators from SUNY Poly, the Army Research Lab, Drexel University, and Gyrotron Technology, Inc. (Gyrotron), Shahedipour-Sandvik is hoping to overcome one of the major challenges in creating these next-generation devices: effective p-type doping in the GaN base.

Fortunately Gyrotron has a new method for activating the dopant, magnesium, introduced through a process called implantation. By using microsecond pulses of electromagnetic waves, the GaN base temperatures may be increased to over 1300 degrees Celsius. Along with a method to stabilize the lattice, the team hopes to get high levels of doping without damaging the GaN lattice.

Additionally, Shahedipour-Sandvik will build the new semiconductors on a GaN base, which ensures the best electricity flow and highest performance as compared to bases of a different material than the lattice. Although GaN bases are expensive and hard to come by, Shahedipour-Sandvik has high hopes: “even if these devices are made on small areas in low volume, they’re still going to be very impactful.”

With this diverse team focused on developing next-generation semiconductors, this new technology may soon become a reality, Shahedipour-Sandvik said.

 

“It really takes a team that has complementary expertise to fully understand the fundamentals of the GaN system and overcome its inherent challenges.” (content credit: https://www.rfsuny.org/RF-News)


STUART, FLORIDA – Coaxial Components Corp. (Coaxicom), a company dedicated to the design and manufacturing of RF and Microwave components is honored to be a “spoke in the wheel” on many of today’s engineering and research achievements.

Whether it’s working with Yale University on non-magnetic connectors, supplying SMA/TNC connectors to NASA, specialized torque wrenches to Argonne National Labs, or hand-crafting, custom cable assemblies for a mid-west university for advancing cardio healthcare.

Companies and organizations from around the globe seek Coaxicom’s parts and expertise because we’ve earned the reputation for military-and medical grade quality, speed and innovation.

To learn more about Coaxicom or to Request a Quote email us here. Or get an instant download of the Product Reference Sheet.

RETURN TO WEBSITE HERE

Weird and wonderful facts about St. Patrick and March 17!

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Did you know that St. Patrick wasn’t even Irish? Or that the Irish can’t claim credit for St. Patrick’s Day parades? Find out more in our weirdest and most wonderful facts.

St. Patrick’s Day is all about the Irish and our beautiful country Ireland but did you know that there are many aspects of the big day that the Irish can not claim as their own invention? Such as the St. Patrick’s Day parade phenomenon, for instance? To get you up to date with all the weirdest and most wonderful St. Patrick’s day facts, here are the top strangest titbits about the patron saint to have you all caught up on your St. Patrick’s trivia.

The Irish can’t claim credit for the invention of the Saint Patrick’s Day Parade

The world’s first recorded Saint Patrick’s Day Parade took place in Boston on March 18, 1737, followed by the New York Parade, which first took place in 1762.

Ireland took over a century to jump on the parade float with the rest of the world and only had their first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dublin in 1931.

This St. Patrick’s Day we’ll all be wearing green, but shouldn’t it be blue?

Parade committee organizers across the world wouldn’t take too kindly to us changing the color, so maybe we’ll leave it at green for now.

100 lbs. of green dye was poured into the Chicago River in honor of St. Patrick’s Day

In 1961, business manager of Chicago’s Journeymen Plumbers Local Union, Stephen Bailey, received permission to turn the Chicago River green for St. Patrick’s Day.
Due to uncertainties about the amount of dye it would take to turn the river green, a massive 100 lbs of vegetable dye was used in comparison to the 25 lbs used today.

Saint Patrick banished the snakes from Ireland

George Washington ordered that “St. Patrick” be the response to the password “Boston” on Evacuation Day

George Wasjington at the surrender of General Burgoyne.

On Evacuation Day, March 17, 1776, the orders issued by Washington were that those wishing to pass through Continental Army lines should give the password “Boston,” to which the reply should be “St. Patrick.”

Drink, drink, and yet more drink!

(content credit: https://www.irishcentral.com/Amanda Driscoll, 

HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY FROM COAXICOM!

Coaxial Components Corp. also known worldwide as Coaxicom, began manufacturing in 1984 at it’s facility in Florida. Coaxicom offers a broad line of SMA, SSMA, 3.5mm, BNC, N and TNC, as well as 50 & 75 Ohm Snap, Screw and Slide-on SMB, SMC, SSMB, SSMC and many other types.

Our large selection of Inter & Intra Series Adapters; RF Connectors; Attenuators; Terminations; Phase Adjusters; Torque Wrenches and Cable Assemblies are ready for quick delivery. Custom products specifically designed, engineered and manufactured to our Customer’s specifications are produced by expertise techs and craftspeople all with over a decade of experience.

 

Mr. Spock Explains Pi….Fascinating!

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HAPPY PI  DAY 2018 EVERYONE!

Pi Day and Pi Approximation Day are two unofficial holidays held to celebrate the mathematical constant π (pi).  Scroll for video.

Pi Day is celebrated on March 14, or in the month/day date format as 3/14; since 3, 1 and 4 are the three most significant digits of pi. March 14 is also the birthday of Albert Einstein so the two events are sometimes celebrated together.

Pi Day is observed on March 14, because of the Ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes’ first rough approximation of pi as being 3.14. (A few years later, Archimedes was able to calculate a much better approximation of pi.) However, 22/7 is actually a closer approximation of pi than 3.14 is. Thus, a more “accurate” Pi Day could be found in the more common calendar, 22/7, or July 22.

Sometimes the so-called Pi Minute is also commemorated. This one occurs twice on March 14 at 1:59 a.m., and 1:59 p.m. If pi is truncated to seven decimal places, it becomes 3.1415926, making the Pi Second occur on March 14 at 1:59:26 a.m. (or 1:59:26 p.m.). If a 24-hour clock is used, the Pi Second occurs just once yearly, on March 14 (3/14) at 1:59:26 in the morning.

There is a large variety of ways of celebrating Pi Day and most of them include eating pie and discussing the relevance of pi. Pi Day is often celebrated with pies, given that pi and pie are homophones.

The first Pi Day celebration was held at the San Francisco Exploratorium in 1988, with staff and public marching around one of its circular spaces, then consuming fruit pies. The museum has since added pizza to its Pi Day menu.

The founder of Pi Day was Larry Shaw, a now-retired physicist at the Exploratorium who still helps out with the celebrations. (content credit: www.cute-calendar.com)

How will you celebrate?


[UPDATED: 3/9/2018] – STUART, FLORIDA – Coaxial Components Corp. (Coaxicom), a company dedicated to the design and manufacturing of RF and Microwave components is honored to be a “spoke in the wheel” on many of today’s engineering and research achievements.

Whether it’s working with Yale University on non-magnetic connectors, supplying SMA/TNC connectors to NASA, specialized torque wrenches to Argonne National Labs, or hand-crafting, custom cable assemblies for a mid-west university advancing healthcare with new MRI technologies.

Companies and organizations from around the globe seek Coaxicom’s parts and expertise because we’ve earned the reputation for military-grade quality, speed and innovation.

To learn more about Coaxicom or to Request a Quote email us here. Or get an instant download of the Product Reference Sheet.

RETURN TO WEBSITE HERE

Coaxicom: A Leader in Non-Magnetic Connectors.

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Coaxial Components Components (best known as Coaxicom) offers one of the widest array of premium, non-magnetic connectors to industry giants such as NASA, Lockheed Martin, and medical device manufacturers like Medtronic.

In the past, ferromagnetic steel connectors with trace quantities of magnetic material present in the strike layers or as material impurities, causing magnetic fields of 1 milligauss or more. This level of magnetism was sufficient to impair the operation of highly-sensitive equipment.
Today, to ensure optimum non-magnetism levels and repeatability, each Coaxicom non-magnetic connector is manufactured under the most controlled process using a beryllium copper body and Tri-M3 plating.

This combination produces no detectable change in magnetic field testing. This result has been repeated, checked and verified by academics and test engineers at Yale University. This type of precision is not just desired… it is a mandate for medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), space exploration and satellite applications.

All  personnel here are responsible for achieving and then upholding quality standards. We always ensure a high level of customer satisfaction and to maintain  commitments, productive relationships, and provide a positive environment for our staff and our customers. – Julian Andrews, Operations Manager

Coaxicom’s non-magnetic connectors are available in SMA, SSMA, MMCX, SMP, and SMB. Many of the non-magnetic pieces are available for immediate shipment and can be delivered within 24-to-48-hours. But for customers requiring unique specifications, Coaxicom works tirelessly with engineers to understand exact technical needs, performance expectations and cost parameters.

Exs. 3118-9 SMA female coaxial connector from Coaxial Components Corp. has an interface type of solder pot receptacle and a 50 Ohm impedance. Female SMA coaxial connector provides a minimum frequency of DC and a maximum frequency of 18 GHz.

3118

 

Coaxicom’s Florida manufacturing facility has been meeting tough delivery requirements while ensuring excellent quality standards since 1984 including military specifications MIL-PRF 39012, MIL-A 55339, MIL-C-83517, and MIL-STD-348 as applicable.

 

For specs, drawings or to request assistance from Coaxicom’s engineering staff, call 866-262-9426, email: Sales@Coaxicom.com or visit www.Coaxicom.com to chat online.


[UPDATE: 3/9/2018-Stuart, Florida, www.Coaxicom.com, ] Coaxicom designs and manufactures an extensive line of standard, as well as custom microwave and RF connectors all available in 50 or 75 Ohm impedance. We have proudly served Customers in industries including the US military, automotive, medical, instrumentation, aerospace, defense, telecom, wireless alternative energy and more. Coaxicom is committed to providing outstanding service, value and quality with our made in the USA RF Connectors since 1984. Coaxicom also offers world-class manufacturing capabilities necessary to deliver the quality and reliability our customers demand including Military specifications MIL-PRF 39012, MIL-A 55339, MIL-C-83517, and MIL-STD-348 as applicable. Learn more about our RF Connectors.

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Coaxicom manufactures and design RF connectors, adapters, and adjusters, cable assemblies and more.

Better particle accelerators with SRF technology.

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Better particle accelerators with SRF technology.

The use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology is a driving force in the development of particle accelerators. Scientists from around the globe are working together to develop the newest materials and techniques to improve the quality and efficiency of the SRF cavities that are essential for this technology. (http://www.fnal.gov/)

The Debut of Coaxicom’s Updated End Launch Connectors.

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Stuart, Florida-March 3, 2018-Florida-based Coaxial Components Corp.,(Coaxicom) designs and manufactures RF and Microwave components that now includes a series of updated End Launch Connectors.

The debut of this durable line of End Launch Connectors is to meet the increasing need of engineers who are required to transition microwave energy from coaxial to planar transmission line structures; applications that mandate high-performance and resolute reliability.

With the prevalence of networking, cyber security, high-speed communications, and even 5G, The Coaxicom End Launch Connector is now a “go-to” solution that saves space, time and money.

Today, Coaxicom offers 1.85, 2.4, 2.92mm, male and female and high and low-profile versions. Other specs include an impedance of 50 Ohm, and a temperature range of -55 to +125 degrees Celsius. The beryllium copper contact is particularly well-suited for telecommunications, wireless and most digital applications. The stainless steel bodies, PEI insulators, and passivated finishes are high-performing with frequencies from 40 to 65-GHz. Gold finishes are also available upon request. 3.2 or 3.9 options can be ordered, but may require a lead time.

All RoHs compliant, the Coaxicom End Launch Connectors are low-loss and available on order by emailing orders@coaxicom.com, or calling 866-COAXICOM (262-9426). Request a data sheet for product specifications.

Founded in 1984, Coaxicom’s mission is to be an engineers’ valued resource by providing a broad array of U.S. made RF/Microwave products from connectors to cable assemblies; along with accessible engineering assistance, and next day deliveries.

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