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Molecule by molecule: How carbon capture cuts CO2 emissions

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Extracting carbon dioxide molecules from a stream of exhaust before the CO2 enters the atmosphere is easier said than done… and it’s not even that easily said.

But, carbon capture and storage (CCS), which also doesn’t roll off the tongue, has the potential to transform the way power plants reduce CO2 emissions. Using CCS technology in a 500-megawatt power plant could eliminate enough CO2 to offset the amount of greenhouse gases that hundreds of thousands of cars produce each year.

The oil and natural gas industry has used CCS for years, but a collaboration between FuelCell Energy and ExxonMobil is developing a new CCS technology that could also produce additional power while removing CO2 emissions.

Check out how carbon capture can reduce the CO2 emissions at a power plant and how that compares to emissions from the automotive and residential sectors.

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Coaxicom, a supplier of RF connectors, and cable assemblies to ExxonMobil for several years  provides high quality products at economical prices to ensure uncompromised satisfaction—allowing Customers to focus on operational needs. And its Coaxicom’s promise to be the best every day, with each Customer we serve.

What differentiates Coaxicom from all the others?

  • Large piece part inventory in-stock and ready for assembly
  • Short lead times – days not weeks
  • Quote and ship same day, if needed
  • Engineering services
  • Small/low quantity orders accepted
  • Custom piece experts
  • Proprietary designs and packaging
  • Price matching
  • US manufacturer with quality materials
  • Machinists with decades of experience
  • Specialists in hard-to-find or obsolete parts
  • Accessible and proven customer support
  • Meets MIL-PRF spec

Locating the part you need quickly is vital to production, so Coaxicom can cross most competitor’s products and supply a part equivalent easily. Coaxicom’s cable builder can aid in finding the assembly you need or design your own from any combination of in-stock compatible connectors and cables.

Request the latest catalog that includes updated drawings, and specs. 

Visit: www.Coaxicom.com.  Email: Sales@Coaxicom.com. Call: 866.COAXICOM (262-9426)

Coaxicom Catalog

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Sign Up for Coaxicom's Latest Catalog

Is Too Much Power a Dangerous Thing?

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RF attenuators are a universal building block within the RF design arena. Dependent upon their type, they can be designed using just resistors, they may need a switch, either mechanical or solid state, or they may use diodes to make them continuously variable over a given range.

What is an attenuator?                                                                               

As the name implies RF attenuators reduce the level of the signal, i.e. they attenuate the signal.

This attenuation may be required to protect a circuit stage from receiving a signal level that is too high. Also an attenuator may be used to provide an accurate impedance match as most fixed attenuators offer a well-defined impedance, or attenuators may be used in a variety of areas where signal levels need to be controlled.

Types of RF Attenuators:     

Attenuators can be categorized in a number of ways according to their capabilities and the technologies they use.

  • Fixed RF attenuator:   As the name implies fixed attenuators have a specific value and this cannot be changed. They may come in a variety of formats from small in-line items in a similar format to connector adaptors to those in small boxes with connectors on the ends to those incorporated within equipments.
  • Variable RF attenuators:   variable RF attenuators are normally used in applications where it is necessary to continuously vary the level of a signal. Typically they provide a continuous level change by varying an analogue voltage on the input control line. They are normally used where accuracy is not a prime requirement.

Applications Include:                                                                           

Attenuators are used in a wide variety of applications for the control and measurement of RF energy and are vital in the wireless, energy, telecommunications, broadcast, military, medical, energy and aerospace industries.

When used within its specifications, an attenuator is an indispensable component in monitoring measurement and system applications. Coaxicom supplies a variety of high-performing attenuators from SMA: VSWR 1.35:1, TNC: VSWR: 1.35:1, BNC 50 and 75 Ohms, and Type N 1.35:1 Max.

For more information on Attenuators, click here, or call 1-866-COAXICOM.

Don’t Miss this Fascinating Story: The Little Spacecraft that Could.

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The Voyager mission was only supposed to last four years. But 40-years after the launch of Voyager 1 and 2, the spacecrafts are still sending back messages from the farthest reaches of the final frontier.

(p.s. sorry for the short commercial but it enabled us to showcase this incredible story you won’t  want to miss.)


Also for nearly 4-decades, Coaxial Components Corp. (Coaxicom), a company dedicated to the design and manufacturing of RF and Microwave components is honored to be a “spoke in the wheel” on many of today’s most revolutionary engineering achievements. Whether it’s supplying SMA/TNC connectors to NASA, specialized torque wrenches to Argonne National Labs, a contributor to the U.S. Navy’s Super Ship, or hand-building cable assemblies for a mid-west university advancing healthcare with new MRI technologies. Companies and organizations from around the globe seek Coaxicom’s parts and expertise because we’ve earned the reputation for military-grade quality, speed and innovation. To learn more about Coaxicom return to the website here. Or get an instant download of the Product Reference Sheet.

(Produced by Andy Court. Associate producers, Evie Salomon, Sarah Fitzpatrick and Alex J. Diamond© 2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

Integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric for the first time

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Your future smartphone may be woven into your machine-washable clothes.

A sample integrated circuit printed on fabric. (credit: Felice Torrisi)

Researchers at the University of Cambridge, working with colleagues in Italy and China, have incorporated washable, stretchable, and breathable integrated electronic circuits into fabric for the first time — opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable textile electronic devices.

The circuits were made with safe, and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet-printing techniques.

The new method directly prints graphene inks and other two-dimensional materials on fabric to produce integrated electronic circuits that are comfortable to wear and can survive up to 20 cycles in a typical washing machine. The technology opens up new applications of smart fabrics ranging from personal health to wearable computing, military garments, fashion, and wearable energy harvesting and storage.

Final step in fabrication of an inkjet-printed field effect transistor (FET) heterostructure on textile. (Right) Side-view schematic and photo. (credit for images: Tian Carey et al./Nature Communications; composite: KurzweilAI)

Based on earlier work on the formulation of graphene inks for printed electronics, the team designed new low-boiling-point inks, allowing them to be directly printed onto polyester fabric. They also found that roughness of the fabric improved the performance of the printed devices. The versatility of this process also allowed the researchers to design all-printed integrated electronic circuits combining active and passive components.

Non-toxic, flexible, low-power, scalable

Most wearable electronic devices that are currently available rely on rigid electronic components mounted on plastic, rubber or textiles. These have limited compatibility with the skin, are damaged when washed, and are uncomfortable to wear because they are not breathable.

“Other inks for printed electronics normally require toxic solvents and are not suitable to be worn, whereas our inks are both cheap, safe and environmentally friendly, and can be combined to create electronic circuits by simply printing different two-dimensional materials on the fabric,” said Felice Torrisi, PhD, of the Cambridge Graphene Centre, senior author of a paper describing the research in the open-access journal Nature Communications.

The process is scalable and according to the researchers, there are no fundamental obstacles to the technological development of wearable electronic devices — both in terms of their complexity and performance. The printed components are flexible, washable, and require low power — essential requirements for applications in wearable electronics.

The teams at the Cambridge Graphene Centre and Politecnico di Milano are also involved in the Graphene Flagship, an EC-funded, pan-European project dedicated to bringing graphene and GRM technologies to commercial applications.

The research was supported by grants from the Graphene Flagship, the European Research Council’s Synergy Grant, The Engineering and Physical Science Research Council, The Newton Trust, the International Research Fellowship of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Ministry of Science and Technology of China. The technology is being commercialized by Cambridge Enterprise, the University’s commercialization arm.


Abstract of Fully inkjet-printed two-dimensional material field-effect heterojunctions for wearable and textile electronics

Fully printed wearable electronics based on two-dimensional (2D) material heterojunction structures also known as heterostructures, such as field-effect transistors, require robust and reproducible printed multi-layer stacks consisting of active channel, dielectric and conductive contact layers. Solution processing of graphite and other layered materials provides low-cost inks enabling printed electronic devices, for example by inkjet printing. However, the limited quality of the 2D-material inks, the complexity of the layered arrangement, and the lack of a dielectric 2D-material ink able to operate at room temperature, under strain and after several washing cycles has impeded the fabrication of electronic devices on textile with fully printed 2D heterostructures. Here we demonstrate fully inkjet-printed 2D-material active heterostructures with graphene and hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) inks, and use them to fabricate all inkjet-printed flexible and washable field-effect transistors on textile, reaching a field-effect mobility of ~91 cm2 V−1 s−1, at low voltage (<5 V). This enables fully inkjet-printed electronic circuits, such as reprogrammable volatile memory cells, complementary inverters and OR logic gates.  (content credit: http://www.kurzweilai.net).

Happy Birthday to the Text Message!

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The FCC was auctioning off radio frequencies to be assigned to new, high-tech paging services.

Click the arrow below for the full audio story.


Coaxial Components Corp. best known worldwide as Coaxicom, began manufacturing in 1984 at it’s facility in Florida. Coaxicom offers a broad line of SMA, SSMA, 3.5mm, BNC, N and TNC, as well as 50 & 75 Ohm Snap, Screw and Slide-on SMB, SMC, SSMB, SSMC and many other types. The large selection of Inter & Intra Series Adapters; RF Connectors; Attenuators; Terminations; Phase Adjusters; Torque Wrenches and Cable Assemblies are ready for quick delivery.

Call:  866-COAXICOM (262-9426)  *  Email: Sales@Coaxicom.com

Click Here to Return to the Coaxicom Website

FREE RF Variety Sample Pack

How does a polar satellite see the world?

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Raytheon tech powers the newest US weather forecast satellite.

More weather data builds smarter forecasts.

The launch of the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 means access to some of the most-accurate, highest-fidelity, near-real-time weather data in the world. JPSS-1 is joining the satellite Suomi-NPP, its predecessor, in a sun-synchronous, polar orbit that will cross the Earth’s surface twice a day.

“Americans have intently followed the media coverage this hurricane season, watching severe storms unfold one after another,” said Mark Sargent, Raytheon’s Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System program director. “Our forecasting ability has dramatically improved over the last decade and polar satellites deserve most of the credit. And it’s about to get better.”

The National Weather Service reports that 85 percent of the data flowing into American weather forecast models comes from “polar orbiters,” providing the public with improved, long-range forecasting up to seven days out.

2.0 AND GO!

Next-gen satellites are only one component of a broader modernization effort. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has partnered with NASA and Raytheon to improve and expand JPSS CGS, its ground control operation.

JPSS CGS is a global system of ground antennas and high-performance computers that process more than 11 terabytes of weather information every day. In August 2017, the next-gen JPSS CGS 2.0 began supporting all JPSS satellites currently in the constellation, while making room for additional missions in the future.

The upgraded system’s flexible architecture and consolidated infrastructure drive fresher observations from outer space to meteorologists, scientists and emergency officials more quickly and reliably than ever before.

“The initial capture of the polar satellite data happens at the North and South poles before we process it and push it out to the forecasters and science community,” Sargent said. “With the addition of JPSS-1, we’ll be able to deliver more observations to the National Weather Service almost twice as fast.”

Critical to the global system are ground terminals located at McMurdo Station, Antarctica; Queen Maud Land, Antarctica; Svalbard, Norway; Fairbanks, Alaska; and White Sands, New Mexico. They will decrease data latency by providing multiple sites for constellation data downlinks.

Following testing in the thermal vacuum chamber, a Raytheon engineer inspects the third VIIRS instrument on Nov. 6, 2017. (Photo courtesy of Reuben Wu)

THE ‘SECRET SAUCE’ SENSOR

Launched in 2011, the Suomi-NPP satellite was the first into space with Raytheon’s Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite of sensors. VIIRS, which will be mission-critical hardware for JPSS-1 as well, provides an unprecedented level of detail and has already helped to make weather forecasts more precise.

“From 500 miles up in space, VIIRS is changing the way we see Earth, and its value goes well beyond weather forecasting,” said Robert Curbeam, director of Civil Space programs for Raytheon’s Space and Airborne Systems business.

The only satellite sensor in the world that can track weather both day and night, it collects imagery in 22 bands of light—from visible to infrared—allowing scientists to observe emerging weather and climate patterns in unprecedented detail, a capability that’s particular important to military operations.

“As a former U.S. Navy pilot, I know the need for accurate, precise weather forecasting is critical … but we take for granted that we’re always going to have it,” said Curbeam, a former astronaut. ”It can make the difference between a successful and an unsuccessful mission.”

WORLDWIDE IMPACT

When it comes to forecasting, successful missions translate to every industry.

When Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Houston, Texas, in August 2017, it was the costliest storm in U.S. history. Damage estimates ran in the hundreds of billions of dollars. One of the major issues: the city’s overall floodplain design.

“We don’t often think about the importance of weather data when it comes to updating an aging infrastructure, but we should,” said Mike Fox, Raytheon’s corporate lead for civil space and weather programs. “While infrastructure bolsters safety and growing economies, extreme weather tests it to its very limits.”

Hurricanes, wildfires, mudslides, blizzards and volcanic eruptions are visible from space.

“We have access to this incredible, one-of-a-kind weather data,” said Fox. “We should use it in our city planning to reduce the chances of neighborhoods being inundated with floodwater.”

Or wildfires. In October 2017, more than 100,000 acres in California were consumed by fire, destroying countless homes and killing nearly a dozen people. The unfolding catastrophe was monitored from space, directly informing evacuation and rescue efforts.

“Every day, thousands of decisions…depend on accurate weather forecasting,” said Matt Gilligan, vice president of Raytheon Navigation and Environmental Solutions. “Weather intelligence is actionable. It can literally save lives.” (content credit:www.raytheon.com/news/feature/jpss1_viirs.html,)

Coaxicom, a supplier of RF connectors, and cable assemblies to Raytheon for several years  provides high quality products at economical prices to ensure uncompromised satisfaction—allowing Customers to focus on operational needs. And its Coaxicom’s promise to be the best every day, with each Customer we serve.

What differentiates Coaxicom from all the others?

  • Large piece part inventory in-stock and ready for assembly
  • Short lead times – days not weeks
  • Quote and ship same day, if needed
  • Engineering services
  • Small/low quantity orders accepted
  • Custom piece experts
  • Proprietary designs and packaging
  • Price matching
  • US manufacturer with quality materials
  • Machinists with decades of experience
  • Specialists in hard-to-find or obsolete parts
  • Accessible and proven customer support
  • Meets MIL-PRF spec

Locating the part you need quickly is vital to production, so Coaxicom can cross most competitor’s products and supply a part equivalent easily. Coaxicom’s cable builder can aid in finding the assembly you need or design your own from any combination of in-stock compatible connectors and cables.

Request the latest catalog that includes updated drawings, and specs. 

Visit: www.Coaxicom.com.  Email: Sales@Coaxicom.com. Call: 866.COAXICOM (262-9426)

Using RF Technology for Fat Reduction & Body Contouring!

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It’s not traditional but after the holidays it just may be necessary! Another amazing use for RF!

One of the newest fat reduction technologies is radiofrequency. Radio Frequency delivers energy to the areas of fat by driving controlled heat deep within the fat cells and subsequently destroys them. Radiofrequency is a very versatile procedure that can be used on any area of the body – from large areas like the abdomen to very small areas such as the chin – with the same degree of success. It uses sound waves to vibrate and cause mechanical disruption of fat cells causing them to break down.

Another benefit of radiofrequency is its ability to reduce both fat and tighten the skin by directing energy to target collagen especially when diet and exercise has failed. Radio Frequency is also ideal for the age-old problem of spot reduction. The treatment program is designed to improve body shape and reduce unwanted fat from areas such as face and neck, upper arms, abdomen, thighs, buttocks, hips, knees, calves, ankles and male breasts.

It is actually not a weight loss procedure but it’s very effective in tightening skin and reducing fat and cellulite in areas that just do not respond to traditional weight reduction methods and also change that you may have acquired hereditary in regards to your proportion.

It’s usually performed using a combination of Bipolar and Unipolar radio frequency on the area to be treated which is heated to a therapeutic temperature range. A number of passes are performed over the area, maintaining an optimum and predetermined temperature range. This process commences the breakdown and removal of intra cellular waste and unwanted fat from specific and treated areas of the body.

Radio Frequency procedure done to the human body conducts current and therefore act as part of the electrical circuit, any resistance encountered by the energy flow will cause heat to be produced at the site of maximum resistance, which can be used to cut or coagulate tissue.

Treatment areas are mapped out to recontour your shape, aided by accurate photographic record and measurements at each step in the process. The treatment usually takes 15 to 60 minutes. Since each person’s pain tolerance and threshold varies, it is difficult to quantify how painful or uncomfortable the treatment is. It also depends on the device used and the power settings for the treatment.

The procedures will work without diet or exercise, but you can greatly enhance your results by improving your diet and exercising.  Also, water is extremely important to aid the body in elimination.  Those clients who have had the best results basically follow these recommendations. 

Radio Frequency is an effective, a new and promising technology for non-surgical body contouring and fat reduction. Most patients usually experience mild redness which disappears quickly and also a mild improvement in their skin tone and smoothness, with a reduction in the appearance of fat and possible inch loss. It is also associated with minimal risks and downtime compared to surgery. However, you may be advised to use certain soothing lotions, creams or gels to lightly apply to the treatment area, or possibly cool, moisturizing mists to apply as you feel necessary.


Coaxial Components Corp. also known worldwide as Coaxicom, began manufacturing in 1984 at it’s facility in Florida. Coaxicom offers a broad line of SMA, SSMA, 3.5mm, BNC, N and TNC, as well as 50 & 75 Ohm Snap, Screw and Slide-on SMB, SMC, SSMB, SSMC and many other types. Our large selection of Inter & Intra Series Adapters; RF Connectors; Attenuators; Terminations; Phase Adjusters; Torque Wrenches and Cable Assemblies are ready for quick delivery. Custom products, specifically designed and engineered to our Customer’s specifications are produced in our Florida facility.

Coaxial Components Corp. (Coaxicom) offers world-class manufacturing capabilities necessary to deliver the quality and reliability our customers demand including Military specifications MIL-PRF 39012, MIL-A 55339, MIL-C-83517, and MIL-STD-348 as applicable. Gold plated stainless steel or passivated versions of SMA connectors are standard in order to meet the finish and corrosion requirement of MIL-PRF 39012. Interface dimensions as well as all other applicable requirements are also in accordance with MIL-PRF-39012 and other military standards where the need exists.

As we keep using more and more mobile devices, the RF spectrum will run out of space.

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Data science institute develops method to allow mobile users to tap into RF-spectrum.

The Data Science Institute and the Electrical Engineering Department at Columbia University received a National Science Foundation grant ($649,963) to develop energy-efficient sensors that will allow mobile and wireless-device users to tap into available, unused channels in the radio-frequency spectrum. The sensors will enable future communication systems to flexibly share the spectrum.

Wireless communications and mobile applications have placed an enormous strain on the electromagnetic spectrum – a finite and limited resource. Large portions of the spectrum, moreover, are already allocated to primary users such as fire departments, the coast guard and firs- responders, who use their channels only in exceptional circumstances. And that’s why there’s a need for sensors and computational techniques that can detect and use the available spectrum when it’s not engaged by primary users.

“At some point in the future as we keep using more and more mobile devices, the spectrum will run out of space,” said John Wright, a DSI affiliate and electrical engineering professor who is the principal investigator on the project. “We’ll use all the data-science tools we possess – machine learning, neural networks, algorithms and advanced computation techniques, in conjunction with new hardware devices – to sense pieces of the RF spectrum as they become available.”

Wright said that Peter Kinget, an electrical engineering professor at Columbia who specializes in analog and radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuits, will design circuits that can create “snapshots” of a large portion of the spectrum. Wright will then use a few of the snapshots to design algorithms to reconstruct the spectrum and help design a more energy-efficient sensor.

What’s novel about this project, said Wright, is that it mixes the latest computational methods with novel hardware design. On the data-science side, he will lead a team to develop computational techniques – algorithms and machine-learning methods to model and predict the available areas of the spectrum. Kinget’s team, on the other hand, will design new hardware – the circuits to sense the available channels in the spectrum.

“This project builds upon our ongoing fruitful collaboration with John’s team,” said Kinget. “In the past couple of years we have demonstrated several RF spectral sensors that generally used off-the-shelf signal-processing approaches with our custom hardware and have demonstrated significant speed and energy benefits. It will be exciting to see how much more progress we can make using new algorithms built on the latest insights in signal processing.”

Wright agrees that the multidisciplinary nature of the project will help it succeed.

“What’s exciting about the research is that the algorithms and computational tools my team is developing can enhance the circuits that Peter’s team is designing,” he said. “And we hope this project will lead to energy-efficient ways to detect and use the RF spectrum, so it continues to be available to the escalating number of wireless-communication users and mobile applications.” (content credit: November 8, 2017, Robert, Florida, http://datascience.columbia.edu)


Coaxial Components Corp. (Coaxicom) has supplied research labs, and universities such as Argonne, Yale and alike, with reliable RF connectors, adapters, and cable assemblies since 1984. As a US Manufacturer located in Florida, we are a trusted resource offering world-class manufacturing capabilities necessary to deliver the quality including military/defense specifications MIL-PRF 39012, MIL-A 55339, MIL-C-83517, and MIL-STD-348 as applicable. Gold plated stainless steel or passivated versions of SMA connectors are standard in order to meet the finish and corrosion requirement of MIL-PRF 39012. Interface dimensions as well as all other applicable requirements are also in accordance with MIL-PRF-39012 and other military standards where the need exists.  Email: Sales@Coaxicom.com Return to website.

This may well be the oddest collection of items that has ever been blasted into space.

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NASA just sent lasers, E. Coli, pizza and ice cream to the ISS on the Orbital ATK’s Cygnus Spacecraft.

On Sunday, NASA launched some 7,400 pounds of cargo aboard commercial space company Orbital ATK’s Antares rocket from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The delivery  included scientific samples, supplies and some goodies to keep the six astronauts on board the ISS cheerful as Thanksgiving and Christmas approach. And who doesn’t want E.coli for the holidays! (www.newsweek.com, November 13, 2017)

Coaxicom designs and manufactures an extensive line of standard, as well as custom microwave and RF connectors all available in 50 or 75 Ohm impedance. We have proudly served Customers in industries including the US military, automotive, medical, instrumentation, aerospace, defense, telecom, wireless alternative energy and more. Coaxicom is committed to providing outstanding service, value and quality with made in the USA RF Connectors since 1984. Coaxicom also offers world-class manufacturing capabilities necessary to deliver the quality and reliability our customers demand including Military specifications MIL-PRF 39012, MIL-A 55339, MIL-C-83517, and MIL-STD-348 as applicable. Learn more about our RF Connectors.

Want a quick quote?  Call 866-COAXICOM (262-9426). Visit the links below and then email:  Sales@Coaxicom.com

ConnectorsAdaptersCable Assemblies – Terminations – Attentuators Phase Adjusters